Gifted and Talented Topics and Issues

Interpretation of Gifted Levels

Interpretation of Gifted Levels*

Math

*Note: Levels are fluid. Students may change levels throughout their development.

Grades K-2—Students in kindergarten, first, and second grades will generally not be formally identified but placed on a watch list. Exceptions may be made for young students requiring Tier III G/T intervention.

Level I  

  • Scores advanced on State standardized test
  • 3 or More STAR scores: 96% or above within a year
  • Scores advanced on District Common Core Assessments
  • Intermediate TOMAGS Gifted Math Assessment: 90-110
  • Students that score above 100 on the Primary TOMAGS will be put on a watch list

The student:

  • transfers learning to novel situations
  • organizes information and data in order to disregard irrelevant data
  • grasps mathematical concepts and strategies quickly, with good retention
  • applies estimation and mental computation strategies

Students may need:

  • Extensions and enrichment
  • Cluster grouping to help facilitate differentiation in the classroom
  • Competitions to help facilitate higher levels of thinking
  • At the high school level: Advanced Placement courses, Youth Options, Course Options

Level II

  • Scores advanced on State standardized test
  • 3 or more STAR scores: 97% or above within a year
  • Scores advanced on District Common Core Assessments
  • Intermediate TOMAGS Gifted Math Assessment: 111-120

The Student:

  • transfers learning to novel situations
  • organizes information and data in order to disregard irrelevant data
  • grasps mathematical concepts and strategies quickly, with good retention
  • applies estimation and mental computation strategies
  • can reverse the reasoning processes and switch methods in a flexible yet systematic manner

Students may need:

  • Extensions and enrichment  
  • Cluster grouping to help facilitate differentiation in the classroom
  • Competitions to help facilitate higher levels of thinking
  • Pre-tests and screeners to determine differentiation needs and strategies
  • Grade level assessments to determine subject grade acceleration-if acceleration is needed a Differentiated Education Plan (DEP) will be developed by a team, which may include: GT resource teacher, classroom teacher, parents, and principal
  • At the high school level: Advanced Placement courses, Youth Options, Course Options

Level III

  • Scores advanced on State standardized test
  • 3 or more STAR scores: 98% or above within a year
  • Scores advanced on District Common Core Assessments
  • Intermediate TOMAGS gifted math assessment: 121-148

The student:

  • transfers learning to novel situations
  • organizes information and data in order to disregard irrelevant data
  • grasps mathematical concepts and strategies quickly, with good retention
  • applies estimation and mental computation strategies
  • can reverse the reasoning processes and switch methods in a flexible yet systematic manner
  • thinks logically and symbolically about quantitative, spatial, and abstract relationships
  • formulates probing mathematical questions that extend or apply concepts
  • solves problems with multiple and/or alternative solutions
  • takes risks with mathematical concepts and strategies
  • applies a more extensive and in-depth knowledge of a variety of major mathematical topics

Students may need:

  • A Differentiated Education Plan (DEP) developed by a team, which may include: GT resource teacher, classroom teacher, parents, and principal
  • Extensive differentiation, a combination of independent research projects
  • Competitions to help facilitate higher levels of thinking
  • Grade level assessments to determine subject grade acceleration, whole grade acceleration, or online instruction
  • At the high school level: Advanced Placement courses, Youth Options, Course Options

Interpretation of Gifted Levels*

Reading

*Note: Levels are fluid. Students may change levels throughout their development.

Grades K-2—Students in kindergarten, first, and second grades will generally not be formally identified but placed on a watch list. Exceptions may be made for young students requiring Tier III G/T intervention.

Level I  

  • Scores advanced on State standardized test **
  • 4 or More STAR scores: 96% or above**
  • Scores advanced on District Assessments- Above grade level F and P

The student:

  • Reads voraciously
  • Possesses an advanced vocabulary

Students may need:

  • Challenging materials that encounter and use increasingly difficult vocabulary and concepts
  • Materials that emphasize higher level thinking skills
  • Cluster grouping to help facilitate differentiation in the classroom

Level II

  • Scores advanced on State standardized test
  • 4 or more STAR scores: 97% or above
  • Scores advanced on District Assessments-Very high F and P

The student:

  • Reads voraciously
  • Possesses an advanced vocabulary
  • Uses words easily, accurately, and creatively in new and innovative contexts
  • Speaks in semantically complex and syntactically complicated sentences

Students may need:

  • Challenging materials that encounter and use increasingly difficult vocabulary and concepts
  • Materials that emphasize higher level thinking skills
  • Instruction that facilitates critical and creative reading
  • Independent open-ended projects and activities
  • Cluster grouping to help facilitate differentiation in the classroom
  • At the high school level: Advanced Placement courses, Youth Options, Course Options

Level III

  • Scores advanced on State standardized test
  • 4 or more STAR scores: 98% or above
  • Scores advanced on District Assessments-drastically above grade level F and P

The student:

  • Reads voraciously
  • Possesses an advanced vocabulary
  • Uses words easily, accurately, and creatively in new and innovative contexts
  • Speaks in semantically complex and syntactically complicated sentences
  • Possesses  fluency, flexibility and originality of thought
  • Exhibits a sense of urgency to read in order to gain knowledge
  • May possess a highly developed sense of humor

Students may need:

  • Challenging materials that encounter and use increasingly difficult vocabulary and concepts
  • Materials that emphasize higher level thinking skills
  • Instruction that facilitates critical and creative reading
  • Independent open-ended projects and activities that emphasize the following: higher levels of thinking, critical reading, vocabulary development, wide exposure to literature, productive thinking, and  imaginative thinking
  • Cluster grouping to help facilitate differentiation in the classroom
  • Extensive differentiation, which might include a combination of independent research projects, subject grade acceleration, whole grade acceleration, and online instruction
  • A Differentiated Education Plan (DEP)  to be developed by a team, which may include: GT resource teacher, classroom teacher, parents, and principal
  • At the high school level: Advanced Placement courses, Youth Options, Course Options

**Many gifted children learn to read early, and as much as this may be a sign of giftedness, it is not always so. Some of the children who are hyperlexic, do learn to read very early, but because they have little or no comprehension are not termed gifted readers (Jackson, Donaldson, & Cleland, 1988).

 

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